Jump to Navigation

Zoning board to review development

The Philadelphia Zoning Board of Adjustment soon will review plans for 32 housing units that a developer wants to build on the site of the shuttered Ivy Ridge nursing home.

The developer has been working with the Wissahickon Neighbors Civic Association since January 2012 when he showed the group his plans to build 32 four-bedroom homes. That plan would have required him to destroy the nursing home and gain zoning variances to subdivide the property into 32 lots. He intended to construct four-story homes, including a basement, and that also would have needed a variance.

Concerned over the potential for increased traffic, parking problems and the interference with the rights of area property owners, the neighbors sought to meet with the developer to modify the blueprints.

The two sides met at the property and together came up with a new plan: the developer will present to the zoning board a proposal to build 16 twin homes, each with a basement garage and parking pad, and to form a new street called Kingsley Court.

Even though the Philadelphia Planning Commission had recommended that Kingsley Court connect to two larger streets, the developer and neighbors are proposing it as a cul-de-sac.

The two sides also have agreed to the developer putting fencing to the rear of the new homes. Additionally, the civic association asked for, and received, conditions regarding traffic patterns and the fa├žade of the homes. The Philadelphia Water Department also has agreed to comply with water basin issues.

This case is a perfect example of how to prevent residential real-estate disputes from occurring. By both sides working together from the beginning, the developer has come up with a plan for housing that will afford him the income he needs from the project. At the same time, the neighborhood association guaranteed that their community will grow with a look it can live with and the privacy provisions it required. Now, they just need agreement from the zoning board.

Source: Roxborough-Manayunk Patch, "Few Hurdles Remain for 32 Proposed Roxborough Homes," Sam Fran Scavuzzo, Sept. 12, 2012

2 Comments

Before you purchase a house, make your own personal measurements of its dimensions.

Make sure that the square footage given by the
master could be exactly the same since the square footage of public record.
The square footage recorded in both places should
be a maximum of 100 square feet in difference.
When they do not match, investigate further or reconsider the transaction.

If you are purchasing a house that you will live in alone,
it is a good idea to have a friend come along with you, particularly if they have some experience in
home buying. This man could be of valuable assistance
merely because they could be in a position to point out flaws
in the house that could otherwise have gone undetected.
Motivate them to speak up and ask questions too.

I love to hear stories like this were builders/developers work with the community to come up with the best possible situation for the neighborhood and surrounding community. I lived in a community once where the neighborhood had a master plan, but half way through construction they changed it. Sure they had meetings over the changes claiming to get input from the neighborhood, but the neighbors didn't like the changes and the developer basically said deal with it. Not good for the community:(

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Subscribe To This Blog's Feed
Contact our firm

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Visit Our Real Estate Law Website >>

Office Location

Avallone Law Associates
215 South Broad Street
Fifth Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19107

Local: 215-253-3855
Toll Free: 877-223-0579
Fax: 215-545-3817

Map
Map & Directions
E-mail the firm

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, a Thomson Reuters business.

FindLaw Network